Saturday, January 20, 2007

Cognitive Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting

From the Google Calender snippet:

http://www.taramillerevents.com/cns2007/index.htm
(website seems to be down right now; hopefully those brainiacs will
have fixed it by the time you click!)

Spring in New York usually means the return of Yankee and Mets
baseball, but in 2007 it also means the return of the Cognitive
Neuroscience Society for its 14th Annual Meeting. This year the meeting
will be held at the Sheraton New York Hotel & Towers. With spring in
the air, the 2007 meeting will have a new program line-up that is fresh
and promises to pique the interests of all attendees. The meeting will
be kicked off on Saturday, May 5, by the George A. Miller Prize in
Cognitive Neuroscience Lectureship, which will be followed by a
reception and the first poster session. Poster sessions will continue
from May 6-8, with additional sessions added on Sunday and Monday to
accommodate the increasing number of submissions (1,100 are expected
this year). Perhaps the freshest change this year will be the symposia
program.

Sheraton New York Hotel & Towers
New York, NY
Sat, May 5
Sun, May 6
Mon, May 7

CNS website:
http://www.cogneurosociety.org/

-Dave

Cognitive Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting

From the Google Calender snippet:

http://www.taramillerevents.com/cns2007/index.htm
(website seems to be down right now; hopefully those brainiacs will
have fixed it by the time you click!)

Spring in New York usually means the return of Yankee and Mets
baseball, but in 2007 it also means the return of the Cognitive
Neuroscience Society for its 14th Annual Meeting. This year the meeting
will be held at the Sheraton New York Hotel & Towers. With spring in
the air, the 2007 meeting will have a new program line-up that is fresh
and promises to pique the interests of all attendees. The meeting will
be kicked off on Saturday, May 5, by the George A. Miller Prize in
Cognitive Neuroscience Lectureship, which will be followed by a
reception and the first poster session. Poster sessions will continue
from May 6-8, with additional sessions added on Sunday and Monday to
accommodate the increasing number of submissions (1,100 are expected
this year). Perhaps the freshest change this year will be the symposia
program.

Sheraton New York Hotel & Towers
New York, NY
Sat, May 5
Sun, May 6
Mon, May 7

CNS website:
http://www.cogneurosociety.org/

-Dave

Tuesday, November 28, 2006

AECOM Autism symposium

Dec. 19th, 2006 8.30am-5.30pm Robbins Auditorium

Morning session 8.30-noon

Christopher Gilberg, MD, PhD "Autism- endemic, epidemic or just there?"

Anthony P. Monaco, MD, PhD "The search for autism susceptibility genes"

Huda Y. Zoghbi, MD "MeCP2 and Rett Syndrome: Gateway to postnatal neuropsychiatric disorders"

Mark Mehler, MD "Autism, neurodeelopmental disorders and epigenomic medicine"

Afternoon session 1.30-5.00

David G. Amaral, PhD "Animal models of autism"

Solomon L. Moshe, MD "Sexual dimorphism of developing brain"

Shlomo Shinnar, MD, PhD "Language regression"

Arthur W. Toga, PhD "Mapping brain development"

Michelle Dunn, PhD "Effective social intervention-based treatments"

Robert W. Marion, MD "A vision of the future for autism services"

Tuesday, October 31, 2006

columbia

Please join Cognitive Neuroscience Division on Thursday morning, November 2, 2006 for a talk by
Dr. Stephanie Cosentino of the Sergievsky Center of Columbia University. The title of her talk is

"A mutli-sample study of APOE and cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease"
The meeting is at 10:00 a.m. in the Sergievsky Center Conference Room on the 19th Floor of Presbyterian Hospital, as usual.

Please note that our Cognitive Neuroscience Division website can be directly accessed at http://cogneurosci[dot-nospam]org/ (replace "[dot-nospam]" with a period and paste into your web browser). Click on "Seminars" to see a calendar of our scheduled talks.

Please call extension 21348 (212 342 1348) with any questions.

Thanks,
Adam and Stephanie

Thursday, October 26, 2006

columbia: geneXenvir. in behav.

Cognitive & Behavioral Neuroscience
Thursday, October 26th 2006
4 p.m. in the Faculty House
Morningside Campus - Columbia University
Dr. Stephen Suomi Chief, Laboratory of Comparative Ethology
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
National Institutes of Health

"How gene X environment interactions shape biobehavioral development in rhesus monkeys and other primates. "

Recent research has identified functionally equivalent polymorphisms in>>specific genes carried by both humans and rhesus monkeys that appear to>>interact with specific early experiences in influencing a wide range of>>biological and behavioral functions. Specifically, a "short" allele of>>the serotonin transporter gene is associated with increased risk for>>depression in humans and delayed early neurobiological development,>>impaired serotonergic functioning, and excessive aggression and alcohol>>consumption in rhesus monkeys but only among individuals with aberrant>>early experiences (e.g., a history of child abuse in humans and early>>peer-only rearing in rhesus monkeys). Similar gene x environment>>interactions involving a polymorphism in the MAO-A gene have also been>>demonstrated in both humans and rhesus monkeys. Additional genetic>>studies have identified several other "candidate" genes for which>>functionally equivalent polymorphisms have been identified in both>>humans and rhesus monkeys. However, genetic analyses of several other>>macaque species, as well as all of the great ape species, have revealed>>that although all of these species possess each of these candidate>>genes, they do not have any of the polymorphisms found in humans and>>rhesus monkeys, i.e., in each case there is no within-species genetic>>variability for any of these genes.>>Implications of these recent findings will be discussed.

clay L

Consicousness Lecture at NYU 10/27/06

Please note that a Consicousness Lecture will take place on Friday, October 27th at 2:30pm in room 551 (4 Washington Pl. - Meyer Bldg.).
Jim Halper, MD, Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry, NYU School of Medicine and Attending Psychiatrist at Lenox Hill Hospital will present “Coma, Vegetative and Minimally Responsive States: New Answers, New Questions.”

Monday, October 23, 2006

Columbia

SAVE THE DATE.

The Rosenthal Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

presents

Nikolaos Scarmeas, M.D.

Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain Columbia University

Mediterranean Diet and Alzheimer's Disease

Wednesday November 8, 2006

12:00 PM to 1:00 PM*

Merritt Conference Room
P&S 3-418, 630 W. 168th Street [next to Student Affairs Office]

*You are welcome to bring lunch

Nikolaos Scarmeas, M.D. is Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology at the Taub Institute, Columbia University. Using epidemiological and brain imaging methods, he investigates the effect of cognitive reserve on coping with brain damage caused by AD. He also studies how cognitive, behavioral, genetic and imaging characteristics of patients with AD contribute to clinical heterogeneity and predict subsequent disease course, including cognitive-functional decline.

Diet is believed to play a (positive and negative) role in AD, but evidence for individual dietary elements is conflicting. Recently, Dr. Scarmeas has begun to investigate the contribution of a composite dietary pattern, Mediterranean diet (MeDi), in AD risk.

Sean L
Columbia

Columbia

This Wednesday, October 25th, please come hear Nestor Parga present his work. The title of his talk is "Network model of spontaneous activity exhibiting synchronous transitions between UP and DOWN states." The abstract is pasted below.

This talk will be in the 7th floor conference room of the Kolb Research Annex at 40 Haven Avenue, from 2PM to 3PM.

Sean L
Columbia

Instructions

Here's how you use this blog.
Cut and paste the e-mail/poster for the lecture. Remember to type in the time and space.
Sign with your name and institution only. Try not to post your e-mail if you don't want to be spammed.

You can also use the comment sections to review the lectures.

Sean Luo
Columbia